Hidden shares and transmission technology


#1

Explain hidden shares. What are the two types of transmission technology available?


#2

A network share on a Microsoft network that is not visible when viewing another computer’s shares; however, it is still accessible if the name of the hidden share is known.
A Microsoft Windows hidden share is created by adding a “$” at the end. For example, if the share was “hope”, adding a “$” to the end of hope, so the shared name is “hope$”, will make a hidden share.

TRANSMISSION TECHNOLOGY:
The transmission means, is that sending a signal from one location to another. Transmission technologies refer to the physical layer protocol such as modulation, demodulation, line coding, error control etc. The transmission technology can be categorized broadly into two types:

Broadcast networks:

• Broadcast networks have a single communication channel that is shared or used by all the machines on the network. Short messages called packets sent by any machine are received by all the others.
• Some broadcast systems also support transmission to a subset of the machines known as multicasting.

Point-to-point networks:

• Point to point networks consists of many connections between individual pairs of machines. To go from the source to the destination a packet on these types of network may have to go through intermediate computers before they reach the desired computer.


#3

Administrative shares are hidden network shares created by Windows NT family of operating systems that allow system administrators to have remote access to every disk volume on a network-connected system. These shares may not be permanently deleted but may be disabled.
To access a hidden share, bring up Internet Explorer or My Computer (or just Computer in Vista), enter the UNC path (\computername\sharename$) of the share, and hit Enter. Alternatively, you can use the computer’s local IP address (such as 192.168.1.1) instead of the computer name
Computer Networks can be classified into two classes regarding the transmission technology they use. They are broadcast network and point-to-point networks.

Broadcast Network:-
Broadcast networks have a single communication channel that is shared by all the machines on the network. Short messages, called packets in certain contexts, sent by any machine are received by all the others. An address field within the packet specifies for whom it is intended. Upon receiving a packet, a machine checks the address field. If the packet is intended for itself, it processes the packet; if the packet is intended for some other machine, it is just ignored.


#4

Administrative shares are hidden network shares created by Windows NT family of operating systems that allow system administrators to have remote access to every disk volume on a network-connected system. These shares may not be permanently deleted but may be disabled.
To access a hidden share, bring up Internet Explorer or My Computer (or just Computer in Vista), enter the UNC path (\computername\sharename$) of the share, and hit Enter. Alternatively, you can use the computer’s local IP address (such as 192.168.1.1) instead of the computer name
Computer Networks can be classified into two classes regarding the transmission technology they use. They are broadcast network and point-to-point networks.

Broadcast Network:-
Broadcast networks have a single communication channel that is shared by all the machines on the network. Short messages, called packets in certain contexts, sent by any machine are received by all the others. An address field within the packet specifies for whom it is intended. Upon receiving a packet, a machine checks the address field. If the packet is intended for itself, it processes the packet; if the packet is intended for some other machine, it is just ignored.
Point-to-Point Networks
Point-to-point networks consist of many connections between individual pairs of machines . To go from the source to the destination, a packet on this type of network may have to first visit one or more intermediate machines. Often multiple mutes, of different lengths are possible, so routing algorithms play an important role in point-to-point networks. As a general rule (although there are many exceptions), smaller, geographicaily localized networks tend to use broadcasting, whereas larger networks usually are point-to-point.